Third-Party Repositories in Fedora 13

From Fedora Wiki - Other repositories:

There are a number of third-party software repositories for Fedora. They typically have more liberal licensing policies and provide software packages that Fedora excludes for various reasons. These software repositories are not officially affiliated or endorsed by the Fedora Project. Use them at your own discretion.

For the RPMFusion repository (a merger of Dribble, FreshRPMs, and rpm.livna.org), as root:

# rpm -Uvh http://download1.rpmfusion.org/free/fedora/rpmfusion-free-release-stable.noarch.rpm http://download1.rpmfusion.org/nonfree/fedora/rpmfusion-nonfree-release-stable.noarch.rpm

For the Adobe repository, which provides both Flash player and Adobe Reader:

# rpm -Uvh http://linuxdownload.adobe.com/adobe-release/adobe-release-i386-1.0-1.noarch.rpm

Finally, for the Skype repository, manually create /etc/yum.repos.d/skype.repo containing:

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[skype]
name=Skype Repository
baseurl=http://download.skype.com/linux/repos/fedora/updates/i586/
gpgkey=http://www.skype.com/products/skype/linux/rpm-public-key.asc
enabled=1
gpgcheck=0

Unrar in Fedora 13

To obtain unrar for F13: as root, create /etc/yum.repos.d/atrpms.repo with contents:

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[atrpms]
name=Fedora Core $releasever - $basearch - ATrpms
baseurl=http://dl.atrpms.net/f$releasever-$basearch/atrpms/stable
gpgkey=http://ATrpms.net/RPM-GPG-KEY.atrpms
gpgcheck=1
enabled = 0

Then, import the repo’s GPG key:

# rpm --import http://atrpms.net/RPM-GPG-KEY.atrpms

Finally:

# yum update

# yum --enablerepo=atrpms install unrar

MP3 Playback in Fedora 13

To get the codec packages required for mp3 (and other media formats not natively supported by F13,) as root:

# rpm -ivh http://download1.rpmfusion.org/free/fedora/rpmfusion-free-release-stable.noarch.rpm

# yum install gstreamer-plugins-bad gstreamer-ffmpeg gstreamer-plugins-ugly -y

Flash in Fedora 13

To get flash working in F13 (i386), visit the Adobe Flash site, select YUM for Linux, and accept the download.

Then, as root:

# rpm -ivh adobe-release-i386-1.0-1.noarch.rpm

.. and then import the provided GPG key:

# rpm --import /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-adobe-linux

To confirm that yum can now access Adobe RPM packages, check to see if /etc/yum.repos.d/adobe-linux-i386.repo exists, and that it contains:

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[adobe-linux-i386]
name=Adobe Systems Incorporated
baseurl=http://linuxdownload.adobe.com/linux/i386/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=1
gpgkey=file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-adobe-linux

Then, it’s simply a matter of installing the required packages:

# yum install flash-plugin alsa-plugins-pulseaudio libcurl nspluginwrapper

During yum operation, you’ll notice the error Warning: RPMDB altered outside of yum. This cannot be avoided as we are dealing with third-party packages. To read more about the error, visit James Antill’s blog entry.

NB: Flash in Fedora 13 is still a CPU-hog, though I’ve now found that this applies to Flash in Linux in general. Where Flash in Windows Vista on the same box would use roughly 10-15% CPU time, Fedora would see 50-60% CPU usage. The problem is compounded by multiple flash sources on a single page - such pages employ flash-based advertisements that, without fail, degrade system performance.

Grub Config in Fedora 13

If the Grub boot-loader resides on the MBR of any disk other than the first (per BIOS’ detection,) you may encounter a issue where Grub does not refer to the first BIOS-bootable disk as (hd0).

I had to trick Grub into mapping my first SATA drive (detected as (hd1) by Grub) as the first boot device, in order for Windows to boot properly:

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# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file
# NOTICE: You have a /boot partition. This means that
# all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
# root (hd0,1)
# kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/sdc4
# initrd /initrd-[generic-]version.img
#boot=/dev/sdc
default=1
timeout=5
splashimage=(hd0,1)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
#hiddenmenu
title Windows XP
rootnoverify (hd1,0)
map (hd1) (hd0)
map (hd0) (hd1)
chainloader +1
title Fedora (2.6.33.5-112.fc13.i686.PAE)
root (hd0,1)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.33.5-112.fc13.i686.PAE ro root=UUID=0d416a7b-cce0-4cbe-a17e-53398af6b943 rd_NO_LUKS rd_NO_LVM rd_NO_MD rd_NO_DM LANG=en_US.UTF-8 SYSFONT=latarcyrheb-sun16 KEYTABLE=us rhgb quiet
initrd /initramfs-2.6.33.5-112.fc13.i686.PAE.img

Fuse Mounts in Fedora 12

Read this bug report.

What’s wrong with that picture?

We’re dealing with a bug that prevents display of $HOME contents via Nautilus browsing and simple shell commands such as $ ls -al. Awesome, huh?

For a Linux distribution that promotes the use of the Gnome desktop environment, it sure does seem that Fedora, and it’s #fedora@freenode legion of bigoted IRC veterans, are dismissive of the bug; a casual mention for the wary does not count.

What this means is that whenever the bug rears it’s ugly head i.e. always, the user’s desktop experience is ruined - personal configurations for applications can’t be accessed.

Since 2009-04-02 05:39:58 EDT, this bug has remained officially unresolved.

A temporary solution for the casual home user that does not involve patching files is to # touch /forcefsckas root, for the next system boot to (hopefully) fix the problem for the duration of the computer’s uptime. Even then, successive reboots (expect to reboot often) requires the user to repeatedly issue the same command.

My non-geek of a girlfriend was not particularly pleased.

Logitech G5 in Fedora 12

In order to get the G5’s side buttons and 3rd button’s left/right tilt functional in both Firefox and Nautilus, in /etc/X11/xorg.conf:

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Section "ServerLayout"
#...
InputDevice "Configured Mouse" "Pointer"
EndSection
Section "InputDevice"
Identifier "Configured Mouse"
Driver "evdev"
Option "CorePointer"
Option "Name" "Logitech USB Gaming Mouse"
Option "ZAxisMapping" "4 5 6 7"
Option "Emulate3Buttons" "false"
EndSection

NB: F12 does not ship with a /etc/X11/xorg.conf file by default; see Fedora’s guide on how to create one.

Additionally, you need to modify $HOME/.Xmodmap to show:

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pointer = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Also, after:

# yum install xbindkeys xdotool

.. in $HOME/.xbindkeysrc, have:

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# Nautilus:Back
"xdotool key alt+Left"
b:8
# Nautilus:Forward
"xdotool key alt+Right"
b:9

On Fedora 12

My girlfriend’s Sony VAIO laptop has been nothing short of a nightmare to maintain. It ran Windows Vista - the Windows M.E. for the Facebook generation - and was indubitably doomed to fail from the OEM.

After addressing one technical problem too many, I decided to do away with Vista on the laptop altogether, and to install a basic Linux distribution. Fedora’s DVD seemed to provide all the tools my partner would ever need in her lifetime of computer-interaction, and so it came to pass that F12 was introduced to the household.

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